Help others:

Donate to the Red Cross

Donate to the Salvation Army

Listing sponsored by
KappaElastin™
Scientific Breakthrough. No Shots
Science response to skin aging.

www.kappaelastin.com

Japanese American National Museum

369 East First Street
Los Angeles, California

Phone: 213-625-0414 -- 1 800 461 5266
TTY:


Statement of Purpose:

The mission of the Japanese American National Museum is to promote understanding and appreciation of America's ethnic and cultural diversity by preserving, interpreting and sharing the experiences of Japanese Americans.

http://www.janm.org/

Highlights & Collections:

The Japanese American National Museum is the first museum in the United States dedicated to sharing the experience of Americans of Japanese ancestry. Through building a comprehensive collection of Japanese American objects, imagies and documents and through a multi-faceted program of exhibitions, educational programs, films and publications, the Museum tells the story of Japanese Americans around the country to a national and international audience.

The Museum's collections, which range from vintage kimonos to World War II artifacts and contemporary art, have been painstakingly assembled from individuals, families, organizations and businesses. We actively collect, preserve, store and display such treasures from around the nation.
The following is a description of our present exhibits:

COMMON GROUND: THE HEART of COMMUNITY
This continuing exhibit presents a moving historical overview of Japanese American communities, beginning with the early days of the Issei pioneers (first generation Japanese Americans) through the World War II incarceration, to the present. This exhibition features objects, documents, photographs, and one of the Museum's largest artifacts: a barracks from the concentration camps at Heart Mountain, Wyoming.

HENRY SUGIMOTO: PAINTING AN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Opens March 24, 2001

At the age of 19, Henry Sugimoto left Japan to make his life in America. Determined to become an artist, he studied in the San Francisco Bay Area and exhibited nationally and internationally. When he was unjustly incarcerated at 42 in the Jerome and Rohwer concentration camps in Arkansas, the experience ireeversibly affected how he viewed himself, his art, and the Japanese American experience.
This retrospective survey features works from the National Museum's extensive collection of Sugimoto's paintings, prints, drawings, and writing, and spans the entirety of his prolific career as an artist.

ALLEN SAY'S JOURNEY: THE ART and WORDS of A CHILDREN'S BOOK AUTHOR
Through February 11, 2001

This is the first retrospective exhibition featuring the art of award-winning children's book author and illustrator, Allen Say. His drawings, watercolor paintings and prose explore themes of longing, belonging and the meaning of "home."

MORE THAN A GAME: SPORT IN THE JAPANESE AMERICAN COMMUNITY
Through February 18, 2001

"More Than a Game" tells the story of one immigrant group through the universally popular topic of sport. The exhibition reveals a unique and often untold perspective on how sport influenced and impacted the evolution of the Japanese American community.

RE-VISIONING MANZANAR: SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION
Through May 1, 2001

Manzanar, one of the ten War Relocation Authority (WRA) concentration camps, has been the subject of multiple interpretations over the last fifty years. Culled from the permanent collection of the Japanese American National Museum, this exhibition features photography, paintings, and contemporary interpretations by a wide range of artists.

FOR A GREENER TOMORROW: JAPANESE AMERICAN GARDENERS IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
Through May 1, 2001

Barred from leasing farmland in the early 1900s, many Japanese immigrants traveled from California's countryside to the cities and turned to another kind of farming - gardening. This profession sustained Japanese Americans when they returned from concentration camps and also Japan after the war. A display, co-sponsored by the Southern California Gardeners' Federation, surveys the gardeners' 100 years of contributions to create "a greener tomorrow" for all Japanese Americans and the larger Southern California community.

Informal education is available through regularly scheduled exhibitions, tours, reading materials and conversations with our knowledgeable docents. Group and school tours are available for 10 or more individuals at reduced admission rates. In addition, our National School Project helps grade-school teachers and administrators incorporate multiculturalism into their exisiting cirricula.

Japanese American historical artifacts; three-dimentional objects; documents; printings; paintings; photographs; moving images; oral histories.

Exhibits & Special Events:

Permanent Exhibits:
 
COMMON GROUND: THE HEART of COMMUNITY

This continuing exhibit presents a moving historical overview of Japanese American communities, beginning with the early days of the Issei pioneers (first generation Japanese Americans) through the World War II incarceration, to the present. This exhibition features objects, documents, photographs, and one of the Museum's largest artifacts: a barracks from the concentration camps at Heart Mountain, Wyoming.
 
2001 Calendar of Events:
First Quarter: January-February-March 2001

Major events:

1. Oshogatsu: New Year Family Celebration   January 7, 1-4p.m.

   Celebrate the New Year at the National Museum with family and friends by enjoying a fun-filled, festive afternoon learning about Japanese American New Year "good luck" traditions. Discover unique foods such as ozoni, a special New Year soup filled with mochi (pounded rice cakes) that ensures good luck throughout the year. While you're there, enjoy the tales of renowned storyteller Nanci Nishimura and Argyle Bunny. You'll also have the chance to join a variety of workshops and decorate a "tree of cranes." Don't miss out on other New Year activities planned throughout Little Tokyo. Bring your friends - admission is free!

2. Children's Concert in Historic Sites   January 27, 1:30p.m.

   Kids and adults alike are invited to explore the richness of Japanese American history with a special Children's Concerts in Historic Sites event.  Sponsored by The Da Camera Society of Mount St. Mary's College and coinciding with the exhibition Allen Say's Journey: The Art and Words of a Children's Book Author, the concert features stories and music from the Japanese American tradition.  Storyteller Denise Iketani and the Taiko ensemble Japanese Festival Sounds, led by drummer Johnny Mori, team up for a high-energy, richly visual performance.  Kids leave with Japanese American sweets and a special toy!

Concert is recommended for children age 4 and above.  Tickets ($18 for adults, $12 for children, $48 for a family package of two adults and two children) also admit you to the National Museum on the day of the concert and can be purchased by calling 310.954. 4300.

3. Little Tokyo Walking Tour   February 10, 10-11:30a.m.

   The Little Tokyo community in Los Angeles was once the residential, business, and cultural center of the largest Japanese American community in the United States until World War II.  Relive history and learn about present day Little Tokyo with National  Museum Docent, Bill Shishima on this historical walking tour through the Museum's neighborhood.  Comfortable clothes and shoes are recommended.  Members $5, non-members $11 includes National Museum admission.

4. 2nd Sunday for Families
   Art on the Courtyard: Explore, Imagine, Create   February 11, 1-4p.m.

   Join the National Museum for a Sunday of Art on our Children's Courtyard to celebrate the upcoming exhibition Henry Sugimoto: Painting an American Experience. Learn about different techniques such as pastels, print making, water colors, and mixed medium collage used by this important American artist.  Try your hand at one or all of these techniques at a variety of art stations on our Children's Courtyard - you'll even have the chance to paint your own experiences on a large wall mural. Music and taiko performances will accompany you!  Invite your friends - admission is free!

5. Day of Remembrance - Community Event   February 17, 2-4p.m.

   Day of Remembrance (DOR), the community's annual commemoration of President Roosevelt's signing of EO 9066 and the World War II exclusion and internment of Japanese Americans and Japanese Latin Americans, will be held at the Japanese American National Museum.  The 2001 DOR marks the 20th Anniversary of the Nikkei for Civil Rights and Redress (NCRR), formerly known as the National Coalition for Redress & Reparation.  The National Museum, the Pacific Southwest District JACL, and  other community organizations join with NCRR in reflecting upon the 20+ year journey for redress and justice, and the continuing efforts for a vibrant and strong community.

6. An Afternoon with the Nishikawa Ensemble   February 24, 4-5:30p.m.

   Featuring a special presentation of To-shihun (Tu Tze-chun): A Musical Drama narrated by George Takei
   Co-Sponsored by Yamaha Corporation of America and the Japanese American National Museum

   Join us for a performance by the Nishikawa Ensemble, an acclaimed Japanese chamber music group.  Led by Kohei Nishikawa, one of Japan's most accomplished players of both Japanese and western flutes, the group will perform a program that uniquely incorporates both traditional Japanese instruments such as the shinobe, nokkan, biwa, with Western instruments such as the flute and piano.  Thirteen year-old Yamaha student, Jonathan Takahashi, will also perform his original composition with Mr. Nishikawa.

The second half of the concert will feature the musical drama, To-shishun (Tu Tze-chun), an ancient fable of one man's journey to personal happiness.  Narrated by actor George Takei, this gripping tale will unfold against a live soundtrack performed by the Nishikawa ensemble.  Please call 213.625.0414 for reservations. Members $5, non-members $8, includes National Museum admission.  Seating is limited.

7. A Sentimental Journey,
    Japanese American National Museum 2001 Annual Dinner & Silent Auction   March 3

   At the Hollywood Palladium, Los Angeles, California

8. 2nd Sunday for Families
   How Does Your Garden Grow?   March 11, 1-4p.m.

   Whether you plant pansies or petunias, roses or radishes, this month's Second Sunday is filled with hands-on workshops and demonstrations that will introduce the joys of gardening to children and adults alike. Gardeners and artists will share how color, texture and light can work together to produce wonderful results. Come dressed in your gardening gear and create your own garden! This program highlights the National Museum's display For a Greener Tomorrow:  Japanese American Gardeners in Southern California.  Admission is free!

For more information, please call 213.830.5659.

9. Gardening 101
   
A Day with Professional Gardeners   March 17, 10a.m.-4p.m.

   Do you look longingly at the beautiful garden photographs in magazines?  Are you ever overwhelmed when you visit a nursery? Confused about which plants thrive in sunlight and which do not? And, how do you get rid of those pests? Experts, including representatives from the Southern California Gardeners' Federation will cover a range of gardening topics from plant selection and lawn care to landscape design and container gardening will gather at the Museum to help you solve your gardening problems. In conjunction with For a Greener Tomorrow: Japanese American Gardeners in Southern California currently on display, the Museum will host an interesting and informative day of question and answer roundtable discussions. 

Please call 213.625.0414 for reservations. Members $15, non-members $20 in advance, $25 at door, includes National Museum admission.

10. After America...After Japan
    Film screening and discussion     March 18. 1 - 3 pm
   
    After America...After Japan will examine the challenges and triumphs experienced by Americans who have lived in Japan and Japanese who have lived in America.  Based on the underestimated power of culture, how have these individuals been changed by their experiences in each country?  Can it be said that their lives and personalities are now a blending of two cultural identities, neither completely American nor completely Japanese?

Regge Life, the film's executive producer/director conducted more than 300 interviews with individuals from both countries who continue to face challenges in determining their new cultural identity.  Life has also produced two other widely acclaimed documentaries "Struggle and Success: The African-American Experience in Japan" and "Doubles: Japan and America's Intercultural Children".  Both were broadcast nationwide on NHK and PBS nationwide.  Life will lead a discussion of his film following the screening.

11. Premiere of "Henry Sugimoto: Painting an American Experience"    March 24, 12p.m.-5p.m.

    The new exhibition "Henry Sugimoto: Painting an American Experience" opens at the National Museum
 
Hours:

Admission & Directions:

Directions:

FROM EAST of DOWNTOWN:

From the (60) Pomona Freeway: Take the 60 West to the 101 North and exit at Alameda. Turn left onto Alameda and right onto 1st Street. The Museum is located on the right-hand side at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.
 
From the (5) Santa Ana Freeway: Take the 5 North to the 101 North and exit at Alameda. Turn left onto Alameda and right onto 1st Street.

From the (10) San Bernardino Freeway:Take the 10 West to the 101 North and exit at Alameda Street. Turn left onto Alameda and right onto 1st Street. The Museum is located on the right-hand side at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.

FROM WEST of  DOWNTOWN:

From from (10) Santa Monica Freeway: Take the 10 East to the 110 North and exit at 4th Street, heading east. Turn left at Central Avenue until you reach 1st Street. The Museum is located at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.
 
From the (101) Hollywood Freeway: Take the 101 South and exit at Los Angeles Street. Turn right off the freeway onto Los Angeles Street and turn left onto 1st Street. The Museum is located on the left-hand side at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.
 
From the (405) San Diego Freeway: Take the 405 to the 10 East to the 110 North and exit at 4th Street, heading east.
Turn left at Central Avenue until you reach 1st Street. The Museum is located at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.

FROM SOUTH of DOWNTOWN

From the (110) Harbor Freeway: Take the 110 North and exit at 4th Street. Head eastbound and turn left on Central Avenue until you reach 1st Street. The Museum is located at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.

FROM NORTH of DOWNTOWN:

From the (110) Pasadena Freeway: Take the 110 South to the 101 South and exit at Los Angeles Street. Turn right off the freeway onto Los Angeles Street and turn left onto 1st Street. The Museum is located on the left-hand side at the intersection of 1st Street and Central Avenue.

Parking is available at nearby parking lots for a nominal fee.


Images.

http://www.janm.org/


Key Personnel:

Irene Y. Hirano, C.E.O., President & Director

 

Tell us what you think.

Do you have any additional comments concerning this site?
Do you wish to receive some information on how to get your museum on the Museums Tour?


Thank you again for your visit.

Google
 
Web www.artcom.com

This page and all contents are © 1995-2013 by Art Emotion Corp., IL. USA.
All information is subject to change - This document is non contractual.